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Home Decor > Tuscan Decorating & Design Center > Italian Kitchen Design

Italian Kitchen Design For Your Home:

Old World Italian Style Adds Warmth & Value

 

"Italian kitchens are fabulous, but how do I 
create this look in my home?"

The Italian kitchen style has grown wildly popular over the last 5-10 years in the US as people have sought to make the kitchen a focal point of their home. 

 

Along with the increasing popularity for the open floor plan, the Italian kitchen style is perfect for entertaining since it seeks to incorporate friends and family into the food preparation process and space. 

 

Gone are the days of the cook being banished to the kitchen, only to socialize later when the food is finally brought to the table. 

In Italian villas, Italian kitchens are the place to be, and are enjoyed by family and friends as they prepare fabulous food. 

 

Another reason the Italian kitchen is such a popular trend is because it is grounded in simplicity, functionality, and comfort.  It is a space for love and laughter, a place to entertain and enjoy. 

 

It is important to keep this in mind as you decide how to decorate your kitchen.  If you are designing a brand new kitchen from scratch, you may want to read our article on Tuscan Kitchen Design.  

 

Whether you are just seeking to add some Italian flair to an existing kitchen design, or changing your kitchen style entirely, here are some helpful hints to keep in mind as you make your changes.

 

Spice up your space with color.

 

Color is probably the simplest way to warm up your kitchen.  While color choices can be very personal, and reflect your individual style, there are a some color palettes that are typically associated with Italian kitchens

 

Italians are in love with the beautiful countryside that surrounds them.  Find inspiration from the outdoors.  Sky blue, olive green, terracotta orange, sunflower yellow, chianti reds, and the list goes on. 

 

If you find yourself "color challenged", check out one of the fantastic decorating books in the Tuscan Book Shop for ideas. 

 

Duplicate the color scheme from a photo of a completed Italian kitchen, selected by professional designers.  This is an easy way to ensure your color selections are a huge success.  More importantly, make sure your new colors instill a sense of joy into your cooking and entertaining experiences.  It's your kitchen...you simply must love it!  

Before Italian Kitchens picture
Before: A classic kitchen with neutral color palette in varying shades of grey and white.

After Italian Kitchen picture with new colors
After: Inspired by nature, a new color palette adds Italian warmth.  Terracotta Tile (walls) Rich Clay Brown (cabinets), and Mediterranean Olive (ceiling).  

Bring the outdoors "in".

Now don't let this scare you.  Italian kitchen style incorporates the Tuscan elements of wood, stone, earth, and water into the kitchen design. How?  Well, here are a few tips to get your creative juices flowing. 

Stone: Think granite, marble, tile, brick, concrete, etc.  These work well on countertops, flooring, backsplashes and most anywhere.  If they aren't in your budget, check out some of the amazing countertop "redo" options at your local hardware store.  There are also some very convincing flooring options available that reflect the "essence" of Italian kitchen stone that won't cramp your budget.

Wood: Mostly used on cabinets, flooring, ceiling beams, and furniture.  Brings warmth and authentic appeal to your space. Cabinets not the right shade?  Select a warm, wood tone of paint to suggest the presence of wood.  You can even do "faux" columns and ceiling beams to add dimension on a budget.

Water:  Usually a natural part of any kitchen, you can showcase this element in your Italian kitchen through the use of artisan style fixtures and faucets. Got room for a fountain?  Counter top fountains are a lovely way to bring the water element into a kitchen, and encourage relaxation and tranquility in the space.  

Earth: Think clay...Terracotta is a great start!  For a more dramatic, artistic Italian flair in the kitchen, consider adding a piece or two of authentic Italian ceramics pottery.  Kitchens instantly look more Italian when decorated with brightly colored canisters, utensil holders, spoon rests, etc.

For more information on incorporating the Tuscan elements into your Italian kitchen, visit our Tuscan Elements article.

Authentic Italian Kitchen photo
2br - Casa Alina - A Tuscan Villa (near Florence)
This traditional Italian kitchen features terracotta tile flooring, stone countertops, and warm wood tones.

Kitchen Design Tool Work Online For Homeowners
 

Tuscan Kitchen Accessories:

Wrought Iron Paper Towel Holder -  Iron  and hand blown glass to suit your style.

Ceramic Roosters - Hand Painted in Italy by master artisans.

Italian Ceramics Canisters - Vivid colors and original Deruta designs from Italy.

Lucianna Dining Set - Sturdy Scrolled Metal Design w/ glass top -  bistro styling for four.  

Where can I learn more about  Italian kitchen decorating?


For more information on kitchen design,  we carry many helpful Tuscan decorating books in our book department.  For excellent instructions on how to add this beautiful style to many locations around your home, we recommend the book Italian Rustic: How to Bring Tuscan Charm into Your Home.

Also, great in an Italian kitchen...wrought iron pot racks.  They are practical, beautiful, and rustic.  Learn how to hang a pot rack here.    

 

 

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For more Tuscan decorating design tips visit our design center:

Tuscan kitchen decorating

How to hang a pot rack

Tuscan Decorating Home

The Tuscan Elements

 

 

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